Ms Skinnyfat

A Food & Travel Blog from Singapore

A Chinese restaurant in the middle of CBD, tucked away on top of a commercial building with no prominent signage in view? You would think that it's quite impossible for them to survive the pandemic, but nope, Myo Restobar still draws in the crowd with their solid dishes featuring 40 years of history and experience from their Kia Hiang roots. You may be drawn in by their Michelin Guide recommended Claypot Spring Chicken but definitely stay for their classic homestyle Cantonese dishes and all-day dimsum.
A bite of the Shitake Mushrooms & Black Truffle Dumpling (3pcs $6) and i knew we had to come back to sample more of Myo's dimsum offering. 
The thin and smooth translucent mochi skin was bursting with the mushrooms and crunchy vegetables filling. It's not huge on the truffle but we enjoyed the flavors just fine.
If you're a fan of the traditional yam ring, you would enjoy the individually portioned Crispy Yam Bag with Scallops ($5 each, min 3pcs) because you get all the goodness of the typical yam ring all in one bite and you will still have space for other dishes. I liked that was crisp and not oily. 
I currently have an aversion to fish and generally all seafood but i was able to stomach the Garoupa Fillet in Claypot with Garlic & Ginger (from $18) and i actually ate more than i expected. The fillet was very lightly seasoned and because Myo only uses the white flesh of the fish, there was no fishy flavors at all. 
The Kia Hiang Claypot Organic Chicken ($28) is what most people go to Myo for. Be comforted that the premium organic chickens did not die in vain- they lived comfortably and listened to classical music, and were also given health supplements (no antibiotics or growth hormones ok). The chicken is enveloped in a sweet cabbage and braised in a rich herbal broth and the overall flavor was on the sweeter side. We probably would have enjoyed this dish a lot more if we didn't eat this at the end of the meal.
We were surprised at the quality of the grilled Miyazaki A5 Wagyu ($40/100g, min 200g). The cut was closer to the chuck so it wasn't too fatty. It's good on its own but you could always add a bit of the black pepper sauce at the side. 
Xi Yan Culinary Group has recently launched a new concept Zing by Xi Yan, a conscious-dining concept which collaborates with The Social Kitchen to provide employment for disadvantaged communities. This casual concept caters to everyone in the family as they do not only serve Xi Yan's contemporary Chinese cuisine but also salads, grain bowls, steaks and pastas, and even croffles!
I must admit that i was skeptical when browsing through the menu which seemed schizophrenic. But after tasting the dishes, i can see the charm and appeal of having such a varied menu. Most importantly, i enjoyed every dish i tried and that says something.
We started with Yum Som O Kung Salad ($15) which is a refreshing mix of pomelo, prawns, and sakura ebi. You wouldn't be faulted for thinking it's a Thai salad as fish sauce was definitely at play here, along with the perk-me-up calamansi and yuzu. We hear that this sauce based is also used on one of the fish dishes. 
Do not miss The Squid Game ($14), which is as popular as the Netflix series. Octopus tentacles are used here actually and we loved the light tempura batter which is tossed in chilli, celery and parsley and lemon and a bit of peppercorns for that light numbing sensation. This was perfect with Xi Yan's blend of shrimp sambal, which they also bottle and retail.
If there's one good thing that came out of COVID-19 for me, it's the appreciation of Korean cuisine, thanks to Netflix and K-drama. I've always prefered Japanese food over Korean, as it is more delicate  and refined, as compared to the one pot, mix-it-all with lotsa sauce, and eat out of a huge metal bowl kinda way of eating. Well consider me a convert. Korean food is best for social bonding over hearty dishes and alcohol. For those who want the best of both worlds, i highly recommend ANJU for a more elegant modern Korean dining and bar experience in a chic and tasteful setting right in little Korea that is Tanjong Pagar. I promise you would not leave smelling like a BBQ post-dinner.
Dinner reservations are hard to come by and i was lucky that a friend made a reservation more than 2 months ago! Forget the regular green or blue bottles of soju. At Anju, they have a curated list of Koreans alcohol and Makgeolli is a special. 
If you are here with more friends, definitely go for their special Champagne Makgeolli ($75, 940ml), which is naturally carbonated. Since there were only 2 of us, we went with the White Lotus Makgeolli ($28, 375ml). The grain liquor was infused with white lotus, which provided hints of floral undertones and a refreshing nutty finish. 
For appetizers, it's a toss between the umami crunchy bomb that is the Bori Prawns ($8) simply seasoned with green baby garlic shoots and salt; or the Black Bean Mascarpone ($16) with sourdough crackers that is my one true love. The latter could be a snack or a dessert due to its delicate sweetness from the sweet Suritae beans. Mix it with Chef’s special chive oil and it provides a savoury headiness. 
Revolver has to be one of the best new restaurants that have opened this year, in the midst of the pandemic no less. You have to admit that they are bold, just like their fiery wood-fired, grill and tandoori offerings made with fresh seasonal ingredients and based on Indian cooking sensibilities. But the boldness works and it's already one of the hardest restaurants to get a booking at.
I was lucky to score a weekend lunch table and had a taste of Chef Saurabh’s revolving menu. While grill houses are commonplace these days, it's rare to find an Indian one like Revolver. 
To complement our 6-course affair ($99), we added a 3-glass wine pairing ($65) for a not too indulgent day-drinking experience.
First, the stuffed courgette flower, filled with a creamy spicy potato mash is first kissed by the fire, and then painted with lemon pickles. The flower maintained its delicate nature and eased us into the meal.
The fresh paneer with coriander pesto has to be the best paneer i've had. The cottage cheese is flown fresh from New Delhi daily and boy that firm tofu texture was kept even though it's finished in the tandoori. I'm not a coriander fan but i mopped up that pesto.
We couldn't help ourselves but to order the Kurobuta pork belly Vindaloo (+$20). Marinated in 5 spices and then grilled and glazed with tamarind pickles, the meat leaned on the sweet side with char siew flavors to it. We expected some heat in the Vindaloo curry sauce to balance the dish but it wasn't spicy at all. Nevertheless, this was very enjoyable.
We enjoyed it more than the Red Snapper with Gunpowder salsa (mix of Indian spices), which was a tad too blackened. Someone needs to watch the fire more closely here.
We thought the Chicken Scotch eggs were a tad out of place on the menu but it was tasty nonetheless. The soft egg was wrapped in a juicy chicken mince and nestled on a crispy nest of fried thin potato strips. The aioli and chili oil definitely helped to spice things up a notch.
Another of our favorite was the Spiced chickpeas with Parmesan Kulchette. Surprisingly, this was the spiciest dish on the menu and the heat was very manageable. Loved the texture and the umami cheesy note to this dish.
To end, the Kulfi Gelato with cardamom spices. It's not as cloying as the traditional dessert but I guess you either like it or you don't.

Come dinner, there are 3 tasting menus to pick from- Discovery Menu ($139), Experience Menu ($199) and Vegetarian Menu ($129). I can't imagine eating more though. Is Revolver worth the hype? It definitely warrants a repeat visit, if i could get a table.

56 Tras Street, Singapore 078997
Tue-Sun : 12 - 2.30pm, 6 - 11pm
Tel: +65 6223 2812
For a year, i was waiting for the most popular Sri Lankan chef Nishi Naleendra to open possibly the first Sri Lankan restaurant Kotuwa in Singapore. Circuit Breaker disrupted his plans and Kotuwa operated as a take-out only concept. When I was ready to give it a try, they stopped service while preparing to open their physical outlet at Wanderlust Hotel. Fast forward many months later, I finally got myself a table at this popular spot. 
Kotuwa is vastly different from Rishi’s first 2 ventures. While Cloudstreet and Michelin-starred Cheek Bistro draw influences from modern Australian, European and Asian, Kotuwa displays Rishi’s Sri Lankan heritage. My own experience with Sri Lankan food wasn’t spectacularly memorable; South Asian food mostly overwhelm my palate with the heavy spices and flavors. I was thus hoping that Kotuwa may change my opinion of that.
To start the meal proper, pick a carb base as your canvas to the spread of sambols, achcharu, and curries. Rice and hoppers are available here and I highly recommend the bowl-shaped fermented rice flour crepe. The crisp-edged bowls provide a touch of tang, similar to an Indian Thosai. Pick the egg one for extra textural enjoyment from the runny yolk. 
South East Asian cuisine is often thought of as cheap street eats but at Botanico and Bee's Knees, the talented young Head Chef Sujatha Asokan elevates comforting familiar flavors into finessed plates that explores history and heritage. The 2018 World Gourmet Summit Female Rising Chef of the Year isn’t afraid to feed diners the pungent fermented prawn paste (hae gor) or sneak in some beef tongue in the tacos but trust me, you’ll eat anything she puts on your plate. 
We started at the casual Bee's Knees at level one with some cocktails and bites. You'd regret not getting the Spicy Duck Loaded Fries ($17) with golden thick-cut fries generously loaded with handfuls of smoked duck chunks and liberally drizzled with mayonnaise, mozzarella and a zingy Sriracha cream. The messy rich, umami heat is best paired with an ice cold beer.
Chef Sue also put a SEA spin on her New York-style fiery Shrimp Pizza ($30). The pie is made in-house and stretched a la minute, and has a slightly chewy texture and crispy bottom. This wicked one is made with a squid ink garlic aioli base, topped with tiger prawns, mozzarella and Parmesan, then finished with a special spicy chili dressing made with palm sugar, chilli, garlic and lime juice, and coriander. Man it was addictive though I warn that the flavors are gonna stick around the whole night. 
Check out the Beef Tongue Tacos ($18), a Vietnamese version served on baby bok choy boats with jicama slaw and cashew cream. 
Now now, this Australian beef tongue is brined for 48h and sous vide for another 18 to give it that super soft texture. It's grilled in the Inka charcoal oven before served. I loved the tanginess of the jicama slaw which composed of pickled bokchoy, ginger flower and lemongrass, and toasted rice powder. Super fresh flavors in this one. 
Easily one of my favorite Chinese restaurants, Man Fu Yuan at InterContinental Singapore has always provided finessed plates of comforting traditional dishes which bring together the family. Their latest menu by Executive Chinese Chef Aaron Tan has spiced things up with innovative techniques along with smoke and fire, providing diners with a multi-sensory experience. 
We started with a luxurious honey-glazed bbq Duroc pork belly char siew ($28 per serving) which was topped with caviar and gold flakes. The meat was served cold but the flavors were robust. I would have preferred a warm piece so that the fats would be creamier. 
The chilled Fanny Bay oysters in hua diao wine, ikura, bonito shoyu ($24/3pcs) was a stunning appetizer and is definitely my preferred way of enjoying the plump shellfish. Served in a cloud of tea-infused smoke, the presentation is certainly to impressed a corporate client but the dish is more than that. The refreshing yuzu dressing provided a touch of sweetness which enhanced the briny freshness of the creamy flesh. 
The braised beef short ribs, wild mushrooms, spicy sauce in lotus leaf ($68) is best eaten with a bucket of rice, which we regretfully did not have. That braising sauce had amassed all the goodness from the chicken mushrooms, morels and the gelatinous meat. The dish is served in a salt crust and flambĂ©ed with peppercorn for a very slight fragrance (hardly noticeable) but it was more theatrics than for flavor enhancement.  
Avenue 87, a tale of two Singapore chef friends Glen (of three Michelin Star Ultraviolet) and Alex (previously from Park Hotel Clarke Quay) who trained and started their careers at the same place and are now back to start this Modern Asian restaurant at Amoy Street

Well-loved Asian favourites (the chefs' childhood favorites and memories) are given a creative twist using traditional and contemporary techniques here, and presented in a four or six course dinner menu ($76/98). Wine pairing is available, as curated by Avenue 87's Beverage Specialist, Si Hao, a Certified Specialist of Wine.
We started with snacks of chicken skin chips (think keropok) and kueh pie tee with a take on curry fish head albeit meatless. 
Hidden under the curry crema are thinly sliced baby eggplants, lady’s fingers, semi-dried cherry tomatoes, and curry leaves. Best way to eat your veg is to hide them!
The first dish was a Japanese inspired salmon sashimi dish, topped with a refreshing icy soy wasabi granita, and accompanied by ponzu pickled wakame, dill oil, and sour cream. 
This was followed by a super comforting fish soup with deep-fried egg floss no less! All components are made from scratch here, with an anchovies and roasted sea bass bone broth with an anchovy buttermilk sauce for that creamy base, balanced with the sweet tanginess of confit tomatoes and sliced bittergourd. The sliced poached sea bass is from Ah Hua Kelong for extra freshness because #supportlocal. So dang good. 
Sambal octopus anyone? Think Peranakan rempah and sambal with a blanched octopus, topped with stir-fried greens (and beansprouts urgh) and a confit egg yolk, wrapped in a attap house looking banana leaf. I didn't quite like the texture of this as it was pretty flat and the sambal could have more kick. 
The main course was a baby lamb rack inspired by Alex’s memories of Vietnamese local meat skewers. The New Zealand lamb was marinated with a Vietnamese-style blend of herbs and spices which gave a satay-like flavor to it. The use of a sweet tangy sauce made from locally-sourced stingless bee honey was genius actually, and helped to balance any gaminess. A rotating choice of sides comes with the meat. My vote goes to the fluffy coriander rice.
Endings made sweeter with 2 sweets thanks to Alex's sweet tooth. The first, a house-made coconut ice cream served with pound cake crumble, papaya, and caramelised pineapple. It had a gula melaka kind of milky flavor to it which was absolutely delish. 
The second dessert, “pisang no goreng" was more than what meets the eye. The fried parcel contained a coconut custard and the banana was found in the ice cream instead. I enjoyed this in more ways than i do a goreng pisang. 

Gotta love the variety of eats at Amoy Street and Avenue 87 certainly stands out with their cuisine. They also do offer a lunch set for that midday craving. Their confit duck with yam rice and salted vegetables is calling out to me. 

Avenue 87
47 Amoy Street Singapore 069873 
Tel: +65 9838 8401 / +65 6970 5491 
Monday to Friday: 11.30am - 2.30pm, 5.30 - 10pm
Sat: 5.30 - 10pm

I'm a fan of SIRI HOUSE if you don't know. Tucked away in the lush greenery of Dempsey Hill, it is an art space, Collective Market retail store, and restaurant rolled into one. The menu, is one that celebrates the vibrance of the Modern Asian family table. The latest edition is based on the favorite food memories of Head Chef Leo Pang (formerly from Le Benardin) culinary team, and you can expect nostalgic flavors presented in new and inventive ways. 

Start with the bites to go with the apertifis. The restaurant’s signature Chicken Fat Cookie ($12), delightful buttery cookie has been given a face lift. Enhanced by chicken fat, topped with a curry spiced cream with chicken skin bits which eats like curry Twisties and peppered with turmeric mushroom dust, each bite brings back fond memories of snacking in front of the TV. 
The Papadum ($10) eats like an Indian roti prata/nacho, with a dip of curry creama spiced up with bits of smoked fish chili. Chef Leo's favorite childhood dish is roti prata with fish curry and that inspired this snack. We loved the light tang from the sour cream, which is very similar to the acidity in Indian fish curry. 
WHO: Birds of a Feather, modern Sichuan cuisine. I'm a repeat customer. Enuff said. Read more here.

WHAT: Food Bundle Set for 2-4pax ($68) for variety's sake even though. This is definitely good to share among 3. 
Find The Chicken in the Chilis- Flavorsome crispy chicken bits with sesame seed and tons of dried chili and peppercorn. The numbing spice kicks in after a couple of bites so do alternate it with the other dishes. 
Spicy Oriental Bolognaise- the noodles are beehoon like and i do love the pull of the noodles. They also held up well during the delivery and wasn't too dry or clumpy. The chili oil of the tangy, pickled chili bolognaise helped. 
Tender Chicken Grains Bowl- a healthy bowl that is big on flavor. I love the mix of grains which were chewy and sweet. I mistook the chicken for oyster mushrooms at the start because they looked so smooth and boy were they tender too. 
Fried Pig's Intestines- the porky flavor was a bit strong or perhaps i'm not accustomed to it since i haven't eaten this in a while. The dried chili powder helped to mask the gaminess a bit. 
Bird's Brown Sugar Fresh Milk Boba Pearl 
x2- BOBA. That's all. 

WHAT ELSE: I struggled because i really wanted to eat the Baked Eggplant with Fried Mantou ($16). This is one of my favorite dishes at Birds of a Feather. Please order it for my sake. You won't regret it. 

HOW: Order from https://www.birdsofafeather.com.sg/en_SG. Minimum order of $50, $5 delivery fees.
WHO: Miss Vanda by One Michelin Star Labyrinth
WHAT: Expensive local food but ok we pay because there are some hot favorites from Labyrinth that is Mod-Sin.
Weekly Family Set Menu for 2 ($88) includes:
Har Cheong Wings- these arrived crispy still and i loved how it's deboned and the juiciness could be fully enjoyed. Super pungent (in a good way) and that sambal belachan is woah! Love this too.
Laksa- if you want a good bowl of laksa, go to Katong 328 (according to Jr). This was more like a seafood curry noodles with unfortunately mushy prawns, plus mussels, her giao and tau pok.
Wagyu Rendang- this super tender and intense rendang would have you reaching for a pot of plain rice, especially with the lumps of buah keluak in it. It's our favorite dish of the lot but we couldn't finish it as the rest of the dishes were all too big on flavors. 
Ang Mo Claypot Chicken Rice- this is chicken rice on crack. Try it on its own before you drench it with the mushroom sauce which i thought was a condensed Japanese Chicken ramen soup. I thought the rice was too mushy actually and together with the soupy sauce, it reminded me more of chicken baked rice. Tad too salty as well. 
HOW: Visit missvanda.sg, drive through pick up at Esplanade. Minimum order of $50 with a $10 island-wide delivery fee. Free delivery above $150. 

You don't have to be in Niseko to enjoy Chef Willin Low's Mod-Sin izakaya dishes because they make an appearance every night at Relish @ Frasers Tower. In the day, enjoy Relish's classic burgers, pastas, and desserts; in the night, pick on bar bites and sharing plates over Japanese sakes and draft beers at Roketto Izakaya. Also, some of Wild Rocket's signatures are also available here! 
Warm your tummy with the Fish Collagen Broth ($5), a dairy-free but surprisingly rich and creamy soup that has extracted all the goodness from the fish bones. While it may look like a simple piece of fried fish, it's actually a homemade omu fish cake. Fish meat is mixed with egg, beaten and fried for the fluffy airy texture, similar to the typical fried egg floss at many fish soup stalls in Singapore.
Willin also likes to tease his dinners with all these Har Cheong (fermented shrimp paste) chicken dishes but he doesn't use any chicken in them. Instead, munch on a flavorful Har Cheong Pork Belly Keropok ($8.50) that is possibly the next big snack (goes perfectly with beer). The saltiness is well balanced with a refreshing Keffir lime mayonnaise.
A milder but more exotic version of the typical Har Cheong Chicken is the Har Cheong Tin Gai ($12), which features fried frog legs that have been mildly marinated in the pungent paste. It tasted like a very good fried chicken actually. Have it with the ginger flower paste and it instantly tastes like a staple on an Izakaya menu.